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On the money: Brits on the hunt for a financially responsible partner this Valentine’s

Written by Justin Basini on Friday, 12 February 2021. Posted in Financial management, Finance

Dating during a pandemic is challenging to say the least.

On the money: Brits on the hunt for a financially responsible partner this Valentine’s

Dating during a pandemic is challenging to say the least. In a year like no other, it seems that this Valentine’s Day, Brits are starting to think more with their heads and less with their hearts with research from ClearScore showing that 40% of people think being financially responsible is a more attractive quality in a potential partner than being attractive themselves. With finances at the top of people’s minds due to the economic upheaval caused by Covid19, whether you’ve been furloughed, made redundant, or needed a payment holiday to help out, what’s surprising is that Brits are still more than more than twice as likely to say ‘I love you’ in the first month of dating (16%), when compared to talking about their finances (7%).

Most of us have a list of ideal characteristics that we’d like to find in a partner, and it turns out that over a third of us (37%) think being financially responsible is  the most irresistible quality in a potential partner - above being empathetic (21%), modest (13%), or outgoing (12%), and deemed just as important as being intelligent (37%).

If you’re hoping you’ll be able to charm your way into a date this Valentine’s with a flashy car, impressive job title or by dressing the part - you’re in for a rude awakening. A staggering three-quarters of people find having a good credit score and being good with money a more attractive feature in a potential partner than having a nice car (73%), or an impressive job title (72%). In fact, those with a good credit score were described as responsible (69%), trustworthy (63%), honest (48%), and intelligent (42%) - a pretty glowing reference.

Talking about your personal finances can be nerve-wracking, but as soon as your finances begin to intertwine - whether that’s through a joint account, mortgage or loan - you become financially associated and that person can negatively (or positively) impact your credit score. This makes the fact that a third of people (29%) avoid the topic of personal finances with their partner as they don’t believe it’s any of their partner’s business even more worrying. One in five (19%) admitted that they wouldn’t talk about their personal finances within the first year of dating and a staggering one in 10 people say they wouldn’t talk about their personal finances until after they’re married.

Whilst being good with money might be a bonus when looking for a potential partner, the state of your personal finances can also be a point of contention when you're in a relationship, sometimes even causing breakups. Close to half (42%) of people would break up with their partner if they found out they had lied about their personal finances, with over a third (36%) breaking up with their partner if they found out they had large debts, and a quarter (26%) if they believed their partner was bad with money. 

It’s not all doom and gloom when it comes to talking money in a relationship though, with 40% saying they speak about their personal finances with their partner whenever they're considering a big financial decision, and one in 10 people (10%) setting up a regular date once a month or more to discuss their personal finances. Why not make a change this Valentine’s and try and be more open to chatting about your personal finances - you never know, it could score you a date. 

About the Author

Justin Basini

Justin Basini

Justin Basini, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearScore, the UK’s leading free credit score and credit marketplace.

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